On The Docket: Ezra Stoller at the Yossi Milo Gallery

30/01/2013 § Leave a comment

Ezra StollerTWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY, 1962

Recently opened and simultaneously placed on the docket, the Yossi Milo Gallery in Chelsea is currently showing a collection of photographs taken by Ezra Stoller (American, 1915 – 2004), one of the most influential photographers of modern architecture.  Entitled “Beyond Architecture,” the exhibit highlights the photographer’s range by juxtaposing Stoller’s rarely-seen images of industry and transportation alongside his well-known architectural photography.  Initially I most looked forward to Stoller’s photos of iconic modern New York buildings like the UN and the TWA Terminal, but I find that I am increasingly drawn to the narrative quality of his photos of working class Americans, their places of work or business, and their homes.  The exhibit is a fascinating look at a mid-century America through Stoller’s inestimably talented eye, and I won’t be missing it.

Ezra Stoller: Beyond Architecture
January 24–March 2, 2013

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue
Chelsea

Ezra StollerEzra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerUnited Nations, International Team of Architects Led by Wallace K. Harrison,
New York, NY
, 1954 Ezra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerGuggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, NY, 1959 Ezra StollerSeagram Building, Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson, New York, NY, 1958 Ezra StollerPepsi Cola Building, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York, NY, 1960 Ezra StollerCBS Columbia, Long Island City, NY, 1954Ezra StollerOlivetti Underwood Factory, Louis Kahn, Harrisburg, PA, 1969 Ezra StollerDuplan Silk Mills, 1943  Ezra StollerJohn Hancock Chicago construction, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill,
Chicago, IL
, 1967 Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerJohn Hancock Building, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Chicago, IL, 1970

All images by Ezra Stoller, via Yossi Milo Gallery.

Desired Destination: Palazzo Margherita

21/02/2012 § 1 Comment

The Palazzo Margherita, located in the town of Bernalda, Italy was built in 1892 by the Margherita family.  Purchased in 2004 by Francis Ford Coppola, the palazzo has been transformed into a tiny (only nine guestrooms) luxury hotel with the kind of interiors that give me heart palpitations.  No staid adherence to one single style here, rather it is the combination of the expertise of Parisian designer Jacques Grance and the input of members of the Coppola clan.  This gorgeous hotel has a cosmopolitan and sophisticated feel, with a healthy dose of Belle Époque.

Hello salon, I think I love you…

…oh yes, it’s quite official now.

The owner of other small hotels in Belize, Guatemala, Argentina and New Orleans, this property was a labor of love for Coppola, as his grandfather, Agostino Coppola, was born in the town of Bernalda.  Bernalda, a small hilltop town near the Ionian Sea in the Bazilicata region of Southern Italy, is not a major tourist attraction, which I think makes this dramatically luxurious hotel even more alluring.  Can you not imagine long lazy days wandering the countryside and exploring the town, lounging in the sun by the pool, soaking in those glorious tubs?

I definitely can.

The Palazzo was also featured in the March 2012 World of Interiors.

Palazzo Margherita
Corso Umberto 64
75012 Bernalda (MT)
Italy

Quite Continental Desired Destinations
~*~Travel Charmingly~*~
All images via Palazzo Margherita and the WSJ.

Ghosts of Train Stations Past: New York Pennsylvania Station

07/02/2012 § 5 Comments

I promise a train and train station moratorium after this post. 

Maaaaaaaaaybe.

Images of the old New York Penn Station (1910 – 1963), designed by the architectural powerhouse McKim, Mead & White.  Every time I have to pass through the wretch that is the new Penn Station — dark, subterranean and horribly bland — I catch myself wishing earnestly that it had survived the 1960s.  Wishing that what is now the busiest train station in North America was something beautiful to look at.  Wishing that it rivaled the glory that is my beloved Grand Central.  But alas, it is not…

Henry Crane had the right idea.
(Sidenote: Mad Men! March 24! Finally!)

For more pictures of Penn, be sure to check out my earlier post Farewell at Penn Station, poignant moments captured by LIFE photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt of WWII soldiers shipping out.

Images via the Library of Congress and the NYPL

Real Property Lust: Danish Station House

08/07/2011 § 1 Comment

There is a certain romance about trains, no?

Jealousy.

Obsessing this morning over how a young Danish family has converted a train station built in 1901 in Ormslev, Denmark, into a simply gorgeous home.  Aside from the design choices I am usually drawn to — white walls, painted floors, mismatched chairs, patinaed surfaces, a dash of the modern, interesting vintage touches, a jumbled gallery space — I love how the couple kept some of the features from its former life as a station house: the ticket office, the safe and the waiting room bench.  While I sometimes have trouble with the conversion of public spaces into private spaces (most frequently the “church to house” conversion), this space pulls it off beautifully while retaining the romance of old-fashioned travel.

Waiting room bench.

Ticket window.

All images via Sköna hem

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with Architecture at Quite Continental.

%d bloggers like this: