QC Loves: Guy Catling

18/08/2013 § 1 Comment

Catling Catling Catling CatlingCatling

In an auspicious turn of interwebby events, I happened upon the work of Guy Catling this week.  While I’m loving most everything he’s produced, his vintage B&W photographs collaged with vibrant graphic patterns are my absolute favorite — especially the dapper gentlemen.  To view more of Guy Catling’s art, head here.

All artwork by Guy Catling.

On the Docket: Scenes from the South

09/05/2013 § 1 Comment

Scenes from the South

I’m just back from Nashville, so it seems fitting that on my immediate list of things to do is to see Scenes from the South, a collection of photographs curated by Susan Sherrick, featuring eight Polaroids taken by my exceptionally talented friend Mikael Kennedy, originally for his Passport to Trespass series.  I had the pleasure of recently catching up with Mikael where we talked about artistic process, inspiration, vocational callings and the Waffle House (aka my newest obsession, as a result of my roadtrip).  Lofty subjects, all.  If you are in New York, be sure to drop by the opening reception tonight at the Howard Greenberg Gallery on East 57th!

Victorians of the Desert

13/03/2013 § 5 Comments

Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten Jim Naughten

Photographer Jim Naughten‘s amazing portraits of the Herero people of Namibia are currently on display at Margaret Street Gallery in London, as part of an exhibit called “Conflict and Costume,” which you definitely should not miss, should you be in the area. It looks to be an exceptionally thought-provoking examination of the intersection of colonialism, culture, tradition, fashion and identity. The beautiful portraits, starkly posed against the barren Namibian desert, closely focus on the tribe’s unique costume — Victorian era dresses for the women, German paramilitary uniforms for the men. Adopted from their colonizers, and slowly personalized with ethnic textiles and the “cow horn” headdresses you see on the women (the Herero people are pastoralists and place high value on their livestock), the Herero tribe honors their warrior ancestors by continuing this sartorial tradition to present day.

Luckily, for those of us unable to make it to London,
you can purchase Naughten’s book here.

Jim Naughten: Conflict and Costume
Runs through April 13, 2013
Margaret Street Gallery
63 Margaret Street
London
W1W 8SW

**UPDATE**  I’ve just been alerted that there is a simultaneous NYC Naughten exhibit at the Klompching Gallery in Brooklyn, running through May 4, 2013!  In fact, the opening reception is tomorrow night (Thursday, March 14, 6 to 8pm)!  Considering that the price for me to view these portraits just dropped from a transatlantic flight to subway fare, there’s no chance I’ll be missing them!

Jim Naughten: Conflict and Costume
Klompching Gallery
111 Front Street, Suite 206
Brooklyn
11201

On The Docket: Ezra Stoller at the Yossi Milo Gallery

30/01/2013 § Leave a comment

Ezra StollerTWA Terminal at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, Eero Saarinen, New York, NY, 1962

Recently opened and simultaneously placed on the docket, the Yossi Milo Gallery in Chelsea is currently showing a collection of photographs taken by Ezra Stoller (American, 1915 – 2004), one of the most influential photographers of modern architecture.  Entitled “Beyond Architecture,” the exhibit highlights the photographer’s range by juxtaposing Stoller’s rarely-seen images of industry and transportation alongside his well-known architectural photography.  Initially I most looked forward to Stoller’s photos of iconic modern New York buildings like the UN and the TWA Terminal, but I find that I am increasingly drawn to the narrative quality of his photos of working class Americans, their places of work or business, and their homes.  The exhibit is a fascinating look at a mid-century America through Stoller’s inestimably talented eye, and I won’t be missing it.

Ezra Stoller: Beyond Architecture
January 24–March 2, 2013

Yossi Milo Gallery
245 Tenth Avenue
Chelsea

Ezra StollerEzra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerUnited Nations, International Team of Architects Led by Wallace K. Harrison,
New York, NY
, 1954 Ezra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerGuggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, NY, 1959 Ezra StollerSeagram Building, Mies van der Rohe with Philip Johnson, New York, NY, 1958 Ezra StollerPepsi Cola Building, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York, NY, 1960 Ezra StollerCBS Columbia, Long Island City, NY, 1954Ezra StollerOlivetti Underwood Factory, Louis Kahn, Harrisburg, PA, 1969 Ezra StollerDuplan Silk Mills, 1943  Ezra StollerJohn Hancock Chicago construction, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill,
Chicago, IL
, 1967 Ezra Stoller Ezra StollerJohn Hancock Building, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, Chicago, IL, 1970

All images by Ezra Stoller, via Yossi Milo Gallery.

Flapperflies

26/11/2012 § 3 Comments

A lovely little rabbit hole I discovered in the New York Public Library Digital Archives: a collection of butterfly cigarette cards that inexplicably swap out the insects for jazz babies, giving new meaning to the term social butterfly.  If you’d like to see the whole set, hop here.

On the Docket: George Bellows at The Metropolitan Museum

15/11/2012 § 2 Comments

Very excited that the retrospective George Bellows, the first comprehensive examination of the great American realist painter’s career in nearly fifty years, opened today at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Perhaps best known for his depictions of boxers and early 20th century New York, Bellows has long been a favorite of mine.  I’ve included here some of the iconic works on display (which you can click through to appreciate in greater detail), but I am most looking forward to making new discoveries in his oeuvre, particularly in the area of lithography.

Of the nearly 120 works on display at the exhibition, approximately a third are devoted to scenes of New York.  Some, like the Cliff Dwellers (1913) below, offer insight into tenement life in Lower Manhattan with rich detail — did you notice the street car on its way to Vesey Street?  Bellows was a member of the Ashcan School, a realistic artistic movement in direct response to American Impressionism and its celebration of light.  Darker in tone and unafraid of dealing with the harsh realities of poverty and the unsavory characters of urban life, Ashcan School art challenges the viewer with its journalistic pursuit of truth.  Fittingly, Bellows’ canvas Up the Hudson (1908) holds the distinction of being the first Ashcan painting acquired by the Metropolitan, in 1911.  The artist was only 29 at the time, making him one of the youngest artists represented in the museum’s collection.

George Bellows is on display at The Metropolitan until February 18, 2013, after which it will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts, London (March 16 – June 2013).

New York by George Bellows

George Bellows
November 15, 2012 — February 18, 2013
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Close Cover Before Striking

17/10/2012 § Leave a comment

How lovely are these prints by Vincent McEvoy?  Inspired by his own personal collection of vintage matchbooks and available in extremely limited supply (only 20 of each!), you’ll need to act fast if you want to make them you own.  To purchase, head over to Pedlars, the amazing vintage-y curiosity shop run by Charlie and Caroline Gladstone that I originally discovered by wandering into their Notting Hill location when I was in London a couple of years ago.

I have to admit, the Gladstones seem to have a pretty perfect life.  They live in the Highlands of Scotland, in a home filled with children, dogs and horses.  They recently revived a 200 year-old inn in north Wales called The Glynne Arms and transformed it into a lovely restaurant and pub.  They are organic farmers, photographers, authors and passionate antique pickers that travel far and wide in the pursuit of vintage treasures.  You can get a glimpse of their adventures on their blog and Charlie’s Instagram (@chasgladstone), but fair warning — it’s definitely envy-inducing.

Words || Richard Avedon

13/08/2012 § 2 Comments

Too good to not share.
Let’s promise to not wait for our Mondays anymore.

“I believe in maniacs. I believe in type As. I believe that you’ve got to love your work so much that it is all you want to do. I believe you must betray your mistress for your work, you betray your wife for your work; I believe that she must betray you for her work. I believe that work is the one thing in the world that never betrays you, that lasts. If I were going to be a politician, if I were going to be a scientist, I would do it every day. I wouldn’t wait for Monday. I don’t believe in weekends.

If you’re headed for a life that’s only involved with making money and that you hope for satisfaction somewhere else, you’re headed for a lot of trouble. And whatever replaces vodka when you’re 45 is what you’re going to be doing.”

Richard Avedon (1923 – 2004)
Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt in New York, 1963.
Image via the Life Archives.

Desired Destination: Las Calles de Borges

08/08/2012 § 1 Comment

True, I’ve already been to Buenos Aires.  But there is something about the land of polo and Peron that keeps calling my name, not least of which was finding Ian Ruschel‘s gorgeous short film in which he follows a fictitious Jorge Luis Borges through the city.  If you haven’t yet been, you must. go. immediately.

In the meantime: see my trip here,
find a few of my favorite places to antique in BA here,
and see my trip to the Argentine Polo Open here.

Quite Continental Desired Destinations
~*~Travel Charmingly~*~

Louis Vuitton The Greatest Words: Muhammad Ali

27/07/2012 § Leave a comment

In an amazing tribute featuring the unmistakable words of Muhammad Ali, and interpretations by spoken word master Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) and talented Calligraffiti artist Niels Shoe Meulman, Louis Vuitton has created a captivating digital experience called The Greatest Words.

Ali, a world-class athlete who is best known for his colorful personality and strong commitment to his personal beliefs, receives a breathtaking multimedia homage that seamlessly unites past with the present, sport with art.  When the trailer debuted last week, I was immediately transfixed by its use of newsreel footage (of course), but the experience itself — presented in Rounds 1 and 2 — is even better.  Touching and immensely affecting, The Greatest Words will undoubtedly lead new generations to explore the inspiring life of Muhammad Ali.

  Round 1

  Round 2

Be sure to visit The Greatest Words.

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