Rabbit Hole || Summer in the Vogue Archives

26/06/2012 § 4 Comments

July 1919, illustration by Helen Dryden.

Similar to the recent release of vintage beach fashion images from Vogue Spain that I highlighted a few weeks back, US Vogue has also decided to open up their vast archive to give us a look at summer fashions dating back to 1899.  Containing some very famous and iconic images, you know I couldn’t resist.  I selected a few of my favorites, but be sure to head over to Vogue to see them all.

These images have me looking forward to my planned
trip to Ft. Tilden this weekend, definitely…

July 1928, photograph by George Hoyningen-Huene.

July 1930, photograph by George Hoyningen-Huene.

May 1933, photograph by Edward Steichen.

July 1940, photograph by Toni Frissell.

May 1941, photograph by Horst P. Horst.

June 1949, photograph by Clifford Coffin.

December 1952, photograph by Richard Rutledge.

July 1954, photograph by Karen Radkai.

January 1956, photograph by Richard Rutledge.

January 1958, photograph by Richard Rutledge.

January 1959, photograph by Jerry Schatzberg.

January 1959, photograph by Tom Palumbo.

January 1966, photograph by John Cowan.

June 1976, photograph by Arthur Elgort.

June 1991, photograph by Patrick Demarchelier.

Hop futher down the rabbit hole here.
All images via Vogue.

Deco Decadence

19/04/2012 § 3 Comments

The Prabal Gurung silk charmeuse gown in the first picture.  Full. Stop.
There are no words to describe that kind of perfection,
or how much Scarlett Johansson does it justice.

And when you add in a liberal dose of deco, old Hollywood glamour, a leopard,
Red Lip, Mark Ruffalo and then put Mario Testino behind the camera,
you already know you’re right up my alley and banging on my door.

Quite well done, Vogue.

Woman of the Hour: Editor Carmel Snow

12/02/2012 § 3 Comments

Carmel Snow at the Harper’s Bazzar offices, 1952.  Taken by Walter Sanders.

When I found these pictures of Carmel Snow, Editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar from 1934 to 1958, I will admit that I did not know very much about her.  With a little research, I discovered that I wasn’t alone.  It seems as though fashion has largely forgotten Ms. Snow, who existed in an era before star Editors like Vreeland, Wintour, Bailey or Alt, but what I discovered was quite a remarkable story about a remarkable woman that bears repeating.

  • Carmel Snow was at Vogue from 1923 until 1933 as an editor, and resigned largely because she wanted to make the fashion editorial more more innovative: take it out of the formal studio setting with artificial light, experiment with shooting on location, etc., and was met with resistance.  She joined Harper’s Bazaar a month after her departure from Vogue.  Her former mentor and boss, Conde Nast, considered it a betrayal and never spoke to her again.
  • Harper’s Bazaar, under Snow, became the first fashion magazine to shoot fashion outdoors and the first to show a model in motion, in 1933.  Can you imagine if all of today’s editorials were still shot in-studio?
  • She nurtured the careers of several imminent photographers, most notably Henri Cartier-Bresson, Brassai and Richard Avedon, who said of Snow “Carmel Snow taught me everything I know.”
  • Snow also discovered Diana Vreeland at a party and brought her on as a fashion editor at Harper’s.  Vreeland of course went on to be the Editor-in-chief at Vogue from 1963 to 1971.
  • The woman worked hard and was definitely ahead of her time.  She didn’t marry until her 30s, had her three children well into her 40s, working through her pregnancies and after her children were born.  She didn’t resign until she was well into her 70s.
  • She rarely slept or ate, but was very fond of the three martini lunch.  She had something of a reputation of nodding off at fashion shows after one too many cocktails.  Her drinking accelerated as she grew older.
  • While small in stature, she was the kind of domineering boss that could successfully keep Vreeland in check and challenge her boss, William Randolph Hearst, prompting a famous memo in which he stated: “Does anyone have any control over Mrs. Snow? I KNOW I don’t.”
  • She definitely had her eccentricities:  she was never without her pearls, dyed her grey curls a pale shade of blue or lavender, snipped the labels of her couture to avoid customs fees, and though married, was most certainly obsessed with Cristobal Balenciaga (who was most certainly gay).

Snow and designer Cristobal Balenciaga, 1952. Taken by Walter Sanders.

Snow and Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel, 1952. Taken by Walter Sanders.

To sit with these two amazing ladies. To be a fly on that wall…

Also, hello bracelet! Amazing!

Snow with Alexey Brodovitch (kneeling), 1952.  Taken by Walter Sanders.

Snow with Diana Vreeland, 1952. Taken by Walter Sanders.

Snow with Harper’s Bazaar Paris editor Marie-Louise Bousquet (second from left) at a press showing for fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli in Paris, 1951.  Taken by Nat Farbman.

Snow with US Vogue fashion editor Bettina Ballard (right) at Schiaparelli in Paris, 1951.  Taken by Nat Farbman.

Snow in 1953, taken by Al Fenn.

For further reading:

A Dash of Daring: Carmel Snow and Her Life In Fashion, Art, and Letters by Penelope Rowlands.  Officially added to my shortlist!

A charming article from Life Magazine, “Reporting Paris Styles is a Business: Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar cover Openings,” details Paris fashion week in 1937 and the competition between Carmel Snow and Vogue editor Edna Woolman Chase.

Previous Persons of the Hour can be found here.

All images via Life.

Style Icon: Anjelica Huston

16/01/2012 § 3 Comments

Spirit animal.

The number of girlcrushes that fondly claim the lovely Anjelica Huston must number in the majillions.  I came to this realization after searching for images for this Style Icon post, and noticing the abundance of posts and the repetition of many well-loved photographs of Ms. Huston.  So here, I’ve tried to offer a few new images to the mix, pulled mostly from her career as a model in Vogue via youthquakers and from a collection shot by Life Magazine on the set of her first film, A Walk with Love and Death, in 1969 (she’s 18 in the photos).

I have always loved the versatility and originality that Anjelica embodies.  I love that she is a tall lady.  That she is darkly handsome in a non-conventional manner.  That she tends to make off-beat character choices.  That she gets even more beautiful as she gets older.  That she was involved with Jack Nicholson for over fifteen years.  That she is a third generation Oscar winner.  Ah, and her voice…

For further Anjelica love, check out Allison and Diana‘s posts.

You can also wander through the youthshakers archive.

Call in the Cavalry {Arizona Muse for Vogue US November 2011}

30/10/2011 § 1 Comment

Inspired by Steven Spielberg’s upcoming WWI drama War Horse, the November issue of Vogue US features lead actor Jeremy Irvine, model Arizona Muse and a gorgeous horse in a brooding, military-inspired editorial.

So in love with this Dior coat.

Also love this look, but you knew that already.
Ralph Lauren Blue and Black Label, Hermes boots.

Photographs by David Sims.
Images via Vogue.com.

Speaking of War Horse, I’m having trouble fighting to the end of the trailer without tearing up.  With the sweeping music, the rolling countryside, a boy’s love for his horse, the backdrop of the Great War and the valor of the men who fought in it, I’m guaranteed to be a complete mess when the lights come up on this one.


“…he’s my horse, sir!”

DONE.

War Horse arrives in theatres on Christmas.

Just When I Thought I Was Out… {Ralph Lauren Collection Spring 2012}

16/09/2011 § 2 Comments

…they keep pulling me back in.”  — Michael Corleone

I suppose I should have never doubted that Ralph Lauren would be my favorite from NYFW.  We go way, way back.  And this time around I flirted with the idea of another man, but the indomitable Mr. Lauren didn’t care.  He waited.  He reclinated.  He knew that when he would drop his glittering collection on my head, I’d come running right back to his side.  He knew that I wouldn’t ever be able to say no to him…

The man was right.

For spring 2012, while most other collections showed influences of the 1930s and 40s, Mr. Lauren reached back even further to a decade he is most comfortable with — the 1920s.  And why not?  His costumes for Jack Clayton’s Gatsby are constantly referenced by fashion and costume designers.  Why not seize upon spring’s nostalgia, ratchet up the glamour and hit his own sweet spot?  Textbook really.  These are clothes for both Daisy Buchanan and Jordan Baker, and you probably already know I tend to like Jordan a bit more…  If you were looking for 1920s with an edge, for the ironic jazz age, you won’t find it here, because that is not what Mr. Lauren does.  You need to go talk to Thom Browne if that’s what you want, because that’s what he showed this week.  Mr. Lauren is unfailingly earnest, and you will either find this boring, or love it to death as I do.  Ralph Lauren is not an iconoclast — he is an icon.  And it is a dying breed at that…

Mr. Lauren’s spring 2012 is iridescent, feathered, and jeweled.  It is club-collared, double-breasted and cuffed.  The palazzo pant is making a return.  You better learn how to tie a tie and how to wear a cloche hat.  And above all, get thyself to a fabulous ball because these gorgeous silk gowns, they are screaming to be worn.

Now, I had to restrain myself here.  Of course I wanted to post it all down to the last drop, but if you really want to see every outfit, you can head over to Vogue for that.  And I highly recommend you do because photographer Marcio Madeira had a field day.  His shots are A.Maz.Ing.  What I wanted to share with you, were some of my favorite looks, coupled with some of my favorite detail shots  (Madeira blew my mind with these — I have yet to see any other runway detail shots that are this lavish, this indulgent).

Ready? Let’s Charleston…

“Let’s, let’s stay together
Loving you whether, whether
Times are good or bad, happy or sad…”

Well done, sir.

All images via Vogue.

Man Up: Marina Muñoz for Vogue.com

08/08/2011 § Leave a comment

Familiar with Marina Muñoz?  She is an amazing Brooklyn-based, half Argentine stylist I first learned about from Lizzie at Tomboy Style as I went through the Q&As to get a sense of the other ladies who had previously answered, in preparation for my own.  When Marina referenced the young girl (Marguerite Duras, writing from her own life) in The Lover, one of my favorite books (and a gift from a very special Mister in my life), I knew this was a woman after my own heart.  She’s been featured all over the interwebs, most beautifully by Tommy Ton on Jak & Jil.

In this recent shoot for Vogue.com, Marina styles herself in a combination of recent pieces from both menswear and womenswear collections.  Beautiful girl in beautiful clothes, exhibiting an aesthetic that I completely embrace.  In fact, today I’m wearing a shirt I may or may not have stolen from a completely different Mister.  Our secret…

Can we talk about this jacket.  Can. We. Talk…?

Neckerchief.  J’adore.

All images via Vogue.com

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