A Liquid Lunch at the 21 Club

28/03/2015 § 1 Comment

21 Club. 21 Club. 21 Club. 21 Club. In honor of the upcoming final (!) season of AMC’s Mad Men, a select group of New York restaurants — the sort of joints that Madison Avenue ad men probably would have favored — featured special lunch menus last week.  Priced at $19.69 — the year of the final season — patrons could treat themselves to the hallowed “liquid lunch” or opt for a prix fixe menu.  It wasn’t something I was prepared to miss, so I corralled a compatriot and made my way directly to the 21 Club.

The 21 Club, formerly a prohibition-era speakeasy, has been in operation since the 1920s and has occupied its current, jockey-decorated location since 1929.  Since its inception 21 has been a favored spot of presidents, celebrities, socialites, politicians, and titans of industry.  A four-story townhouse with multiple private rooms, its famed secret wine cellar has housed the private collections of folks like Ernest Hemingway, John F. Kennedy, and Frank Sinatra.  Today, 21 retains a sense of old-fashioned formality that has become somewhat unique – gentlemen are required to wear jackets to gain entrance to the dining room, servers are dressed in tuxedos.  The Bar Room, where we lunched, sports a ceiling decorated with antique toys, suspended in air.

If you know me at all, you already know I went for the cocktails: Manhattans made with Canadian Club, while my dining partner opted for gin martinis.  Feeling very Roger Sterling and Don Draper, we also ordered for a dozen oysters, and a fabulous, mid-century time was had by all.

21 Club
21 W. 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019

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Harvey Faircloth Fall Winter 2014 Look Book || Bright Lights, Big City

27/03/2014 § 1 Comment

Harvey Faircloth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah Kunkel oth FW14 by Mariah KunkelSomehow, I find myself on the other side of a really jam-packed NYFW and FW14 market, with no blogging to show for it.  I supposed that if I had something really amazing to share, you might let me get off with a light punishment…perhaps?

I am pleased to present the Harvey Faircloth FW 2014 look book, which I had the honor of shooting myself on Impossible Project polaroid film with a Polaroid Spectra ProCam.  Different from our past look books which are much more straightforward, our aim was to capture the essence of season’s inspiration: our Creative Director Christopher Rivers’ memories and favorite places of late night New York City during the late 1980s and early 1990s (“Bright Lights, Big City”).  Intimate and ephemeral, it has a undeniably voyeuristic quality — it almost feels like we’re following this girl on a nighttime prowl all over the city.

Working in Polaroid was challenging in a really great way.  Because the photographs take time to develop, I had to shoot and move on in the interest of time.  In an era of digital cameras and Photoshop, truly only having one chance was initially daunting but eventually liberating.  I first figured out how to focus and then shortly thereafter I found a way to trust myself.

I hope you enjoy it!

Photographer: Mariah Kunkel
Hair: Walton Nunez
Make up: James Vincent
Model: Kuyan Elliot (Re:Direct)

Rabbit Hole: The Getty Museum Open Content Program

14/08/2013 § 2 Comments

Walker Evans
Second Avenue Lunch, 1933.
Walker Evans
South Street, 1932.

Walker Evans
Coney Island Boardwalk, 1929
Walker Evans
Girl in Fulton Street, 1929.
Walker Evans
Couple at Coney Island, 1928.

Walker Evans
A bench in the Bronx on Sunday, 1933.

I discovered an exciting bit of news today!  In an effort to encourage the free exchange of works of art, The Getty has placed online over 4,600 high resolution images of artwork in the museum’s collection as part of their Open Content Program.  As long as they are properly attributed (see below), the images are available for anyone to use, publish or modify for any purpose.   The collection currently contains a wide range of media, everything from paintings to manuscripts to sculpture, including these amazing pictures taken by Walker Evans in New York City during the 1920s and 1930s.

 Find more information about Open Content at The Getty here and here.

Search the Open Content images yourself here.

Last but not least, you can see an earlier post about Walker Evans here.

All images courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program.

Strangers on a Train

11/03/2013 § 4 Comments

Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker Evans Walker EvansIf you assumed that furtively snapping photos of people on the subway was a relatively new social phenomenon, ushered in large part by fancy smartphones, American photographer Walker Evans would beg to differ (if he were still alive, that is).  Between the years of 1938 and 1941, Evans rode New York City subways with a camera hidden in his coat, in an effort to capture unguarded and unposed portraits of city commuters as they rode the train.  The portraits offer a remarkable glimpse into old New York, although I can’t help but notice that some things — like catching a quick snooze and/or ignoring musicians, for example — don’t really seem all that different from the subways of today.

At The Weekend II

27/01/2013 § 2 Comments

ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATW ATWSome of my favorite moments spent over Men’s Market Week in New York.  Highlights included an extended visit from my lovely friend Veronika from Lark, a really awesome Vancouver-based men’s and women’s boutique you should get familiar with (not least of all because they are currently having a pretty great sale).  I was happy to made the rounds at (capsule) and also dropped by The MRket Show with Marisa to see the amazing speakeasy-inspired menswear installation created by the gents at Brooklyn Dry Goods.  I also managed to fit in an evening stroll across the Brooklyn Bridge, a bit of avocado toast at Cafe Gitane at the Jane Hotel and a wander through the Chelsea Antiques Garage.  A rather full weekend, indeed!

QC Loves || Bridge & Burn F/W 2012

17/12/2012 § 1 Comment

A gorgeous little love note to New York, Bridge & Burn‘s Fall/Winter 2012 short by Monica Reyes makes me want to bundle up in Erik Prowell’s amazing collection and take an extra long walk around the city.  I’ve long been a fan of this Portland-based brand that effortlessly mixes just the right amounts of ruggedness, prep and menswear detailing, and Fall/Winter 2012 has definitely proven to be no exception to this rule.

Be sure to visit Bridge & Burn.

BBW2012 BBW2012 BBW2012 BBW2012 BBW2012

On the Docket: George Bellows at The Metropolitan Museum

15/11/2012 § 2 Comments

Very excited that the retrospective George Bellows, the first comprehensive examination of the great American realist painter’s career in nearly fifty years, opened today at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Perhaps best known for his depictions of boxers and early 20th century New York, Bellows has long been a favorite of mine.  I’ve included here some of the iconic works on display (which you can click through to appreciate in greater detail), but I am most looking forward to making new discoveries in his oeuvre, particularly in the area of lithography.

Of the nearly 120 works on display at the exhibition, approximately a third are devoted to scenes of New York.  Some, like the Cliff Dwellers (1913) below, offer insight into tenement life in Lower Manhattan with rich detail — did you notice the street car on its way to Vesey Street?  Bellows was a member of the Ashcan School, a realistic artistic movement in direct response to American Impressionism and its celebration of light.  Darker in tone and unafraid of dealing with the harsh realities of poverty and the unsavory characters of urban life, Ashcan School art challenges the viewer with its journalistic pursuit of truth.  Fittingly, Bellows’ canvas Up the Hudson (1908) holds the distinction of being the first Ashcan painting acquired by the Metropolitan, in 1911.  The artist was only 29 at the time, making him one of the youngest artists represented in the museum’s collection.

George Bellows is on display at The Metropolitan until February 18, 2013, after which it will travel to the Royal Academy of Arts, London (March 16 – June 2013).

New York by George Bellows

George Bellows
November 15, 2012 — February 18, 2013
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Oh Sandy

29/10/2012 § Leave a comment

A very sandy kitty dealing with Hurricane Hazel.
Taken in Wilmington, North Carolina, 1954 by Hank Walker.

So this hurricane stuff is getting to be a yearly thing, it seems — me, having to scamper from my home in Lower Manhattan, for higher and drier ground elsewhere in the city.  Such is the life of a Zone A resident.  In any event, please rest assured that I am safe and sound and will be riding out Hurricane Sandy with good friends in a more favorable Zone. To earn my keep I’ve brought an armful of glossy magazines and Auntie Mame, and have been on round-the-clock hot toddy duty.  One must have priorities, clearly.

Please do your best to be safe in the storm, East Coasters.

All best,
M.

Some helpful links:
NYC Office of Emergency Management Evacuation Zone Finder
National Weather Service
Downtown Alliance – Lower Manhattan
Red Cross Go Bag Checklist

Your theme song, courtesy of Danny Zuko:

New Kid in Town || Massimo Dutti on Fifth

17/10/2012 § Leave a comment

After a whole lot of lusting and a whole lot of waiting, Massimo Dutti has finally opened the doors at its very first stateside location, on Fifth Avenue.

They’ve also taken this opportunity to release a rather handsome NYC Limited Edition Collection — which just so happens to be shopable online, just in case your MetroCard can’t quite get you to 5th Avenue and E. 54th Street.  The pinstripe suit and the studded slips are personal faves, but be sure to click through to see the entire NYC Limited Edition Collection…as well as the sparkling new US e-commerce site.

And of course, there’s a collection for the gents as well.

Massimo Dutti
689 Fifth Avenue, at E. 54th Street
New York,  NY 10022

New York City by André Kertész

26/09/2012 § 2 Comments

“I write with light.”
— André Kertész

How I adore The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection of
André Kertész photographs taken in New York.

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